Disney: Whoops – or the re-examination of the Duchess Satine in context of Mandalorian Creed Culture

Let’s talk about the Mandalorian. Yes, Wee Readers, even I the most noble of wee lassies in the land of Scotland, have fallen victim to the charms of that most adorable of terrors to the Star Wars Galaxy…Baby Yoda.

Though all joking aside, The Mandalorian is a fantastic show – and is in fact the only reason I even bought a subscription to Disney + in the first place. Tellingly I canceled it as soon as it was made known to me that I’d have to wait an entire year for the third season. Sorry WandaVision, you’re just not to my taste.

Okay, a brief rundown for those probably very few of you not in the know already. The Mandalorian tells the story of Mandalorian bounty hunter, Din Djarin. Who, with the promise of the return of a huge collection of the sacred metal Baskar, accepts a job to go hunt down a particularly hard to find assest? In fact, it’s so hard to find that the only description the client can give him is the thing’s age: 50. Which is only made all the more shocking when Djarin shows up to the thing’s last known location and finds…a baby. More specifically a baby Yoda.

After some bonding, and many misadventures – one of which involving the bounty hunter going back to save the adorable tot from the client he delivered him to – the two form what is referred to in-show as a ‘clan of two’. Basically short hand for family. You see the Mandalorians are not a people, they are a creed: anyone can become a Mandalorian, whether by swearing the creed in adulthood or being taken in as a ‘Foundling’ during childhood. And this is a very interesting stance for the first show that is specially about the Mandalorians to take, considering they’ve never been shown like that on screen before.

What the heck do I mean?

Well, to answer that we’re going to have to take a look at the previous Star Wars things Dave Filoni, has been involved in, namely The Clone Wars – a show detailing well…the majority of the clone wars conflict and Rebels, a show that looks fine but that I will never have the patience to watch all the way through. Now the Mandalorians have a presence in both these shows, with one of the main characters in Rebels even being one. I’m going to focus more on the Clone Wars Mandalorians, since I’ve just seen more of that show and I think it better shows some of the…unfortunate implications.

Okay, so at the time of the Clone Wars Mandalore is ruled by the Duchess Satine, who is a pacifist. And if that seems contradictory to what a Mandalorian is or has ever been before – congratulations, that’s how everybody else sees it too. I’m joking of course, but there is noticeable friction between Satine’s strictly pacifist government and the fringe groups who think that Mandalore should go back to its more warlike ways. Sounds like a pretty straightforward conflict doesn’t it? After all Star Wars has always taken the stance that war, and those who go looking for it are bad. Sure, somethings need to be fought for or at least against, but as a general rule if there’s some other way to resolve the conflict you should probably take that route. This isn’t helped any by the war loving factions going by the ridiculous name of Death-watch – which was a stupid name when it came out and is an even dumber name now.

That being said I would not be writing this blog post if that were the end of the story. When we first see Mandalore in The Clone Wars, Satine’s group ‘The New Mandalorians’ has been ruling for what we can assume are at least a good few years, her government is firmly established and over all, the population we’re shown doesn’t seem to have much of an issue with converting to a peaceful existence. Except something feels a little off when you look at the population, particularly in crowd scenes – they all look a little too similar. All human, all white, all with the exact same shade of blond hair and every single one of them with blue eyes. This is peculiar in the Star Wars universe, as even back in the very first film where the cast on screen were all monotone white – because 70s –  hair and eye colour varied greatly. There are blog posts that go far deeper into this than I’m going to and I suggest, if nothing else than for curiosity’s sake to go check them out :

[https://izzyovercoffee.tumblr.com/post/159974237850/hi-there-i-saw-your-post-about-satine-committing].

[https://cienie-isengardu.tumblr.com/post/169729716762/ncfan-1-cntw-ethnocide-ethnic-cleansing]

The only character that really breaks this monotony is the Prime minister who has purple eyes for some reason – and also turns out to be secretly corrupt – and Satine’s sister. Still, they’re both white, so I suppose it’s less of a difference than it really feels. Some have implied that this was not a goof and was a deliberate attempt to create a paroral to a country like Germany. Somewhere that had a militaristic / violent past but was trying to move away from that. That seems very likely when the rouge groups have dumb names like Death-Watch – very Nazi like. To try and segment this story they even go out of their way to cast doubt on Jango Fett’s claim to the title of Mandalorian. With the prime minister referring to him as ‘just some random bounty hunter’.

And while that might have worked fine when it was released, it starts to have more sinister undertones in universe, when you take in to account the Mandalorian show. Unlike the other on-screen appearances of the Mandalorians – or at least the Clone Wars, I’m really not sure about Rebels – the Mandalorian approaches its main character’s identity, as something a person can become, not as something they are automatically born into. Anyone can be a Mandalorian – the joke Bill Burr makes in his first episode, about Mando being a Gungan under his mask is funny partly because it could be true. Yes, this Mandalorian is a human, but there’s nothing in his Mandalorian creed that would prevent a Gungan from donning that helmet too.

Anyone can be a Mandalorian.

And this isn’t just a facet of Din’s ultra-traditional sect either; in a later episode of season 2, when we meet Boba Fett properly again, he reveals a copy of his linage. Revealing that Jango Fett (who was not a member of the Children of the Watch) was a foundling – just like baby Yoda – and as a son of foundling, Boba was entitled to his armor in Mandalorian custom. So, we can see from this that adoption seems to be an important aspect of the wider Mandalorian culture as well. Thus, it would make sense that by the time of the Mandalorian Civil War in which the new Mandalorians ceased control of the planet, that the Mandalorians as a people would be very diverse. Not just in the regular human way, but with individuals from different alien species considered Mandalorian as well.  Maybe there would even be linages of mixed human and alien origin; since not only have we seen instances of such individuals in Star Wars Canon, but in a society where anyone can be a Mandalorian, such pairings would probably be a lot more common than even in the wider Star Wars Galaxy. And yet, every single Mandalorian we see in the Clone Wars is human, and white, with at least a good chunk of them also being blond.

Now for a very brief second, I did consider that this could just be clashing creators, after all Clone Wars – or at least most of it – was, to the best of my knowledge made before Disney bought Lucasfilm and did a hard reboot for every cannon piece that wasn’t this show or the films. After all, Disney Lucasfilm clearly has a different direction they wanted to take the franchise, and maybe not every aspect of a long running show like The Clone Wars is going to slot easily into that new image. Except…the Mandalorian, The Clone Wars, and I think Rebels too, are all at least in part run by the same person: Dave Filoni. A man who is remarkably comfortable throwing around references to his other work, and just expecting the audience to know what he’s talking about . For instance, it’s really exciting when Asoka says to the villain of the week “Where’s Thrawn?”. Indicating that we’re gonna get a live action General Thrawn, in all his blue space-Nazi, badass glory. But if you don’t know who that is, she might as well have asked where the toilet was?

Joking aside, my point is that Filoni clearly hasn’t forgotten either of the Star Wars Shows he’s previously been involved in, so it’s unlikely he’s forgotten this one element. Especially considering how little there was about the Mandalorians in the Clone Wars. So, what is going on ? Why do they all look the same here, when they really shouldn’t given the creed like nature of their ancestors existence.

Well, honestly, I think it’s an oversight. Like maybe the creators were so married to this idea of former Nazis in Space that they didn’t really think how such a people, or indeed such a society would exist in the Star Wars Universe. Because, Nazi like racism doesn’t really exist in the Star Wars Galaxy, or at least not in the same way it does on earth. I know, I know the Empire has always sort of taken inspiration from Nazi imagery; but that hate and bigotry towards other kinds of humanity, that resulted with the Nazis obsession with blond hair and blue eyes doesn’t really exist in a world where you have aliens to scapegoat instead. Or at least it’s never done so in what is now considered Star Wars cannon. Granted to the best of my knowledge, I haven’t seen every book or comic, or game that’s come out under that umbrella – so if you know something that can prove me wrong, by all means put it down in the comments. It’s why I have them at all.

The point is, a mistake is really the only logical conclusion you can reach, in which you don’t start to hate the creators of these shows just a little. Because, now with the Mandalorian in cannon, it’s kind of revealed that that war like past we were told was so terrible, and just dragging Mandalore down – at least in The Clone Wars – was not a parallel to the Nazis at all. Which really only leads to one conclusion, on why those people were so monolithic in their appearance – Satine’s government had done a purge.

An ethnic cleansing if you will, I don’t mean to be insensitive to anyone but that’s what it looks like.

Think about it – it’s established early on in the first Mandalorian Clone Wars story arch that all Mandalore’s warriors have been banished to one of the moons, where it’s believed they died out years ago. (They didn’t but that’s not really important for our argument here). When we look at this with knowledge of the Mandalorian Creed – a sacred vow that is about being a Warrior – that statement suddenly becomes about a lot more people than it was probably originally meant for. If you became a Mandalorian through that creed, in a sense, you can’t obey the new regime’s orders and still be Mandalorian. How then do you define who can be a Mandalorian? Well…blood. Which can get very sinister very quickly, especially if you take in the lack of any mention – at least in The Clone Wars – of ‘Foundlings’ as an important aspect of Mandalorian culture. In fact, if you want to take it a step further, the prime minister’s dismissal of Jango Fett as a real Mandalorian could be an indicator of Satine’s governments views on ‘foundlings’ as Mandalorians.

But ultimately all this amounts to is a thought experiment, I do not actually think this was deliberate at all. Mainly because the show itself makes it pretty clear that we’re supposed to agree with, if not outright like Duchess Satine. I mean I never did, she’s terrible – but that doesn’t take away Deathwatch’s cartoonish villainy, or the tone of the narrative. Sure, Satine’s government might be corrupt, but she’s not. And isn’t that in the end, what really matters? I’m being facetious of course, but you get my point. Ultimately the uniformed look of the people of Satine’s Mandalore was a passing thought by a creator who may have later realised the unfortunate implications of what he was showing on screen. We might guess this by the later appearance of the Mandalorians as a people, namely Rebels character Sabin Wren and her family. All of whom are defiantly not white, and this is never treated as a strange thing by any of the other Mandalorians.

That being said, seeing how unhealthy attached to his former works Filoni seems to be – it will be interesting to see if he ever addresses this discrepancy, or if we’re going to have to swallow another sickenly sweet spoonful of ‘wasn’t Satine just the best’.

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The Wee Lassie’s Top Eleven Elderly Badasses from Fiction

What ho Wee Readers, well those last two posts had some contentious stuff in them, didn’t they? I had to delete at least one troll argument. And I bet you’re thinking after that I probably want to take it down a notch with my irritation at the current situation – maybe you even hoped that’s exactly what I did with this post, after all it’s just a top eleven list, nothing contentious in that surely. Well…psyche! Because we’re gonna talk about elder abuse.

11.Abe Simpson

Well if we’re going to talk about the uncomfortable subject of Elder Abuse around a top eleven list of the most badass elderly characters in fiction, than there’s literally no better character to start with then Abe “Grandpa” Simpson. Born to parents Orville and Yuma Simpson sometime before WWI, Abe spent his adult years during WII basically fighting in as many military units as he clearly possibly could. He was part of the Army, the Navy, the Air Force, and the Marine corps. There is some evidence this might be exaggeration on his part, but since he is a cartoon, I’m just going to treat this as accurate until it’s outright proven false.

Unfortunately, due to his advanced age, and rapid decline in mental capably – Grandpa Simpson is not given the respect you’d think he should be by either his family or wider society. If he’s not being ignored, or mocked by most of the cast – except maybe Bart in more recent years – then he’s being used by the writers to tell some quite frankly very uncomfortable jokes. Like remember when Homer fantasized about smothering his father to death, so he wouldn’t have to take care of him anymore? Yeah, that was a joke. Look the Simpsons is a great show, I’d even argue it’s very underrated in its later seasons – but elder abuse is a very serious topic, and sometimes jokes like that can help normalise it to the wider viewing public. Something we have a very high tolerance for in our society anyway – for instance in a recent poll of 2,500 people in the UK, 34% of them didn’t see acts of violence towards older people as abuse at all. And nearly half of them fully believed that not attending an older person’s needs didn’t constitute abuse. So yeah Homer, bit not good there.

10. Yoda

Now some people might claim that it’s cheating to use an alien from a science fiction movie in my elderly bad-ass list, but to them I reply with the words of the great man himself. “When 900 years old you reach, look as good, you will not.”

After spending roughly eight-hundred years training Jedi, this little green alien retired into exile at the rise of the Empire, whereupon he stayed hidden on his not-home planet of Dagobah until being discovered by the wanna-be Jedi Luke Skywalker. He is a master of the force, a CGI puppet with a light-saber, and in our modern-day pop culture he is the epitome of judging not by the size, or as chance would have it…the age. For 900 years old he may be, but right to the day he dies and becomes one with the force, Yoda is a dangerous force to be reckoned with and even powerful force users like Obi-Wan Kenobi know not to underestimate or discard him as disposable simply for his age or his erratic behaviour. Something that would be nice to see in today’s society. Oh? Don’t know what I’m talking about, well sit back because the next paragraph is gonna be pure rant.

Earlier in the year, an opinion piece published in the Telegraph noted that the 1918 pandemic of Spanish flu left such a large impact on the economy because it mainly affected what he referred to as ‘primary-breadwinners’. Which apparently the Coronavirus does not. In fact, he would go on to say, the 2020 pandemic could have a positive impact on the economy because and I quote…

‘Not to put too fine a point on it, from an entirely disinterested economic perspective, the COVID-19 might even prove mildly beneficial in the long term by disproportionately culling elderly dependents.’

This would be despicable in itself, but it adds a new layer of sinister when it turns out that a large amount of the governments around the world seem to have accepted a view like this one, as their actual policy when dealing with the pandemic.

9. Baby Jane Hudson

The antagonist of Henry Farrell’s 1960 book “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” and its various on-screen adaptions – the most famous being 1962 adaption starring Bette Davis – Baby Jane Hudson is a former child star aged out of her marketability. She’s trapped in the delusion of reviving her old act, along with a severe case of alcoholism. What makes this character more terrifying – or at least as far as any fictional villain is terrifying in today’s world – than sad is the fact that she has complete control over her wheelchair bound sister. By the end of the story Jane has practically locked her sister in the house, and prevented any contact between her and the outside world. Gee you must be wondering, I wonder what the Wee Lassie is using this to segue into now…well, I’m not one to keep an audience waiting, so I’ll show you.

The Lockdown – no matter what you may think of how needed it is – often disproportionally affects older people in a negative manner. Not only because of the usual rates of loneliness, isolation and sometimes starvation [but more on that later] that comes from being essentially cut off from the rest of the world. But also, because lockdown restrictions are often much harsher on those over the age of 65 – for instance in Bosnia and Herzegovina anyone over 65 wasn’t allowed to go outside. And there were no exceptions from this rule – you weren’t allowed to go the shop to buy food, or the pharmacy to pick up your medication. You weren’t even allowed to take out your rubbish and if you were caught, you were fined. This may seem shocking, but the truth is this sort of thing is happening all over the world – and even less drastic seeming measures (such as shielding) can have a terrible impact both physically and psychologically on anyone.

8. Olenna Tyrell

When we think of house Tyrell, if we’re not thinking about Margery or her brother, then it’s likely that we’re thinking about Olenna. Like Tyrion, she represents what many of us liked best in Game of Thrones – that is the clever writing and the focus on people, that often don’t get given the respect they should in high fantasy stories. However, unlike Tyrion, Olenna gets given that kind of respect in story as well as out. Olenna Tyrell’s son might be the lord of Highgarden but who are we kidding, it’s Olenna that rules the roost. Her words, like many of the best GoT characters, are the most powerful weapon she has and hers are some of the sharpest, easily putting even main players like Cersei Lannister in her place. However, after her family is murdered and she is left alone, it’s notable that she no longer uses this strength of words to build someone up in a positive way, but rather tear them down. We can see this most definitively in her last act before she dies. She tells Jamie Lannister that she killed Joffrey, and asks that he tells Cersei that it was her (meaning Olenna) that did it. A last act of symbolic revenge, before the Game of Thrones takes her down.

Hmm, a noble woman in a fictional fantasy land, how am I possibly going to connect this one to elder abuse within the current coronavirus pandemic? Well, I suppose that like many elderly people today, Olenna’s society, and the rules she has played so closely to, have failed her when she most needed that support. She is left alone in her grief, almost…isolated you could say. After all many older people, suddenly alone and without control over their circumstances – whether those circumstances involve being separated forcefully from your own family for ‘the greater good’, or having them blown up by one of your political enemies really doesn’t matter – can suffer from severe psychical and mental health conditions, not limited to cognitive decline and even depression. BINGO! We have a winner!

7. Hector Salamanca

Hector Salamanca is not a good man. He’s a former drug runner and enforcer to Don Eladio of the Mexican Cartel. He murdered the partner and possible lover of Gustavo Fring, to send the young entrepreneur a message. And he was instrumental into indoctrinating his own three nephews into that world, once holding one of their heads underwater and trying to drown him to teach his brother a lesson. So, yeah bad man – however through the course of both Breaking Bad and its prequel Better Call Saul, we watch Hector lose more and more of what made him who he was. In Better Call Saul after he’s poisoned, he suffers from a stroke and loses his ability to both walk and speak. By extension he also loses his business and much of his old power within the Cartel – not all of it, but a lot. But whatever, he passes his business onto his nephew Tuco and he goes on with his new life. It might be difficult, but at least he has his family – and family, as he mentioned while he was trying drown his nephew, is everything.

However, starting with the death of Tuco in Breaking Bad, Hector’s family slowly but effectively begins to get picked off. One of his twin nephews is killed when he tries to assassinate Hank, while the other is quietly taken out later in the hospital by Mike. His cousins, his friends, his old boss Don Eladio, even his own Grandson – all taken out by Gustavo Fring. He is left alone and forgotten in a nursing home with his only means of communication, the bell on his wheelchair. This is illustrated by the fact that the care home staff will often leave Hector in a corner, or alone in his room staring out his window – not from any malice per say but because it is so easy to forget about him now. So, to a man like Héctor Salamanca, the idea of turning himself into a living bomb to destroy his enemy – Gustavo Fring – and therefore escape his lot, seems the only logical course of action.

While the solution is different from many other people’s reaction, I’d assume, the notion of being neglected or forgotten in a nursing home when you’re no longer able to see your family, really isn’t – especially now. During the Covid19 Pandemic there has been a rise of elder death within long-term care facilities, however studies show that many of these deaths were not caused by Covid19 itself. Rather people died of hypovolemic shock, or if you would rather fluid loss. That is, shut in their rooms during lockdown, with 40% of staff just not showing up, old people like Hector Salamanca were left to die of thirst. When you look at things that way, I’d almost prefer to go out with a bang.

6. Abbé Faria

In real life Abbé Faria was a Luso-Goan Catholic monk and one of the pioneers of the study of hypnosis – however in Alexander Dumas’ the Count of Montre Cristo he takes the role of the prisoner in the next cell over from the future Count. He’s a genius in almost absolutely everything from language, history, politics, to tunnelling out of a sheer stone prison. He buries into the county’s cell where they become friends and plan to make a proper escape. However before they can, the Abbé dies, the count pretends to be his corpse to escape and the rest is literary history.

Speaking of death, let’s turn our eyes from the still body of the Abbé dressed in the Count’s prison uniform – and to a more contemporary time, where you’d think we’d know better. You’d be wrong, but you would think that. The Abbé Faria’s corpse is mishandled, however as it was done to help his best friend escape their shared prison, it’s most likely he wouldn’t have minded very much. The same cannot be said for elderly people unlucky enough to die in nursing homes during this pandemic. With staff – due to fears of infection – encouraged to stay away, bodies were just left in the beds they had died in. Respect for the newly dead…what’s that?

5. Lady Violet Crawley

Alright I’ll be honest Wee Readers, I didn’t watch the Downton Abbey movie, it’s just the series got so boring by the end. Ghee it’s almost fetishizing the overly wealthy at a time of austerity and global pandemic is kind of sick.

Anyway, back on topic, my current distaste for the show and its content speaks deeply to why Violet is so high on this list. You have to be one of the funniest things on tv to keep even the socialists coming back to your boring show about how hard rich people’s lives are. That’s about all I’ve got to say about her, she makes me laugh. Her class on the other hand…

Statistically speaking in any kind of health crisis – but most notably in the covid19 pandemic – it’s the poor who suffer. We see this particularly in countries without some kind of universal healthcare, like America. Where many people can’t even afford to go to a hospital let alone receive prolonged treatment from one.

However stepping back into the actual topic of the blog post, while many old people were dying from isolation and lack of care, to protect them from potentially contracting the virus, what was the geriatric heir to the throne doing? A man who I will remind you had actually tested positive for the virus. That’s right, moving himself and his potentially infected staff all the way up to Balmoral Castle. Without so much as a whack on the wrist.


Well, clearly the governments of the world have made their opinion clear. If you’re going to recklessly decide to be old during a pandemic, you better be rich while you’re doing it.

3. Ruby Johnson

My favourite character in the series Blackish, Ruby Johnson, is the mother of lead character Andre Johnson, ex-wife of the, producer played, Earl Johnson, and thorn in the side / mother-in-law of manic doctor Rainbow Johnson. On a scale of one to ten Ruby considers herself a twelve, which should tell you all you need to know about her self-confidence. Let’s see what else, she once burned down her husband’s boat, but in my opinion the bastard had it coming. Look I’m not saying I’d damage property if I was cheated on like that but…I think for legal reasons it’s best I not go on.

However, what I love most about Ruby is how much she loves her family and how much they love her. I mean she’s awesome and everything, but Rainbow’s still kind of a saint for putting up with a mother in law like Ruby, living in her house. One big loving, if slightly difunctional, family that are allowed to help each other. Not everyone’s lucky enough to have that.

During lockdown many elders who live alone, and thus who rely on the help of neighbours or – if they have them –  adult children, to go to the shops and get the things that they need, have been unable to get that help. Gee I wonder why? Thus, terrifyingly, many of them have been admitted into hospital with admission diagnoses of “starvation”.

2. Mike Ehrmantraunt

When you think elderly fictional bad-asses – if you ever think of something so specific – odds are you’re thinking of him. It speaks to Mike’s bad-ass nature or at least the popularity of his character that he went from being a bit part at the end of season 2, to one of the main protagonists on Better Call Saul. A show that I stopped watching partway through season four because it is like watching sand do nothing. So, let’s instead turn away from that show, to the far more fascinating tale of Breaking Bad. In particular the power trio he forms with Jesse and Walt in season 5, particularly the ending of it. Namely the fates of the three characters: Mike and Walt die, while it is Jesse the youngest of the trio that is able to get away and – as we see in the Breaking Bad Movie El Camiono – make a fresh start. As with many stories, the old must make way for the young.

Now I’m not saying that it was the intention of the Breaking Bad Writers to kill off Mike and Walt because they were getting too old – Walt himself is more middle aged and his death is clearly the result of his own actions, literally it’s his own gun that shoots him in the side. As for Mike it’s strongly implied that he dies in the plot to signal how far Walt has fallen; Mike is going to die in season five because Walter is so out of control. So, while the author’s intent might not be to cull the elderly, it does follow the interesting trend when it comes to characters at that particular point in life. Look back on this list in particular, how many characters died, or were hinted to be on the way out by the end of their book and or film / tv show?  Over half of them. The old mentor, or parent figure, dying so that their young prodigy can go on to either avenge or surpass them is a tried and tested plot thread for a reason after all. Heck in Star Wars they’ve done it so often they’ve almost made a joke out of it. However, watching the rapid rise of Star Wars’ elderly death count changes from funny to actually kind of insidious, when we live in a society that leaves their elderly to die of thirst. Or prohibits them from even leaving their houses.

Look I love Breaking Bad, but stories even great ones do not exist in a vacuum of their own creating. In many ways the media we consume not only reflects but dictates much of our world view. And trends in media that make us write off that old mentor character as dead before the end of act two, is much more troubling and apathetic in a world where the government is actually doing that in real life.

2. Sophia Petrillo

Picture it, Sicily, possibly 1905, Sophia Pertrillo is born and the start of an amazing story begins. Moving to Brooklyn after breaking off her engagement at the ripe old age of fourteen, Sophia would later – much later I assume – marry Salvador Petrillo and have three children with him. However, in Golden Girls we first me Sophia long after her husband has died and she is freshly escaped from Shady Pine retirement home. A place that is so terrible in her stories that it’s practically a prison.

It’s worth noting that although she’s prone to exaggeration – Sophia is genuinely afraid of going back to Shady Pines, so there must be some truth in her story. Gee…a retirement home so neglectful that it’s basically a prison, wow…sure wish that wasn’t as relevant as it is. No, no I’m being silly retirement homes aren’t like regular old prison, no… they’re much closer to be death row at this point.

During the 2020 Covid Panic to free up space in hospital beds many nursing home residents were put back into their communities either without being tested for the virus or, even worse, testing positive for it. Two weeks after lockdown – a time in which infection should have been lessening –  1800 nursing homes in England were continuing to have outbreaks. They’ve locked these people off from their families, and restricted their care in theory to stop the infection from spreading. But if that was really the case, then why are you putting infected patients back in their communities? Why not keep them at the basically empty hospitals?

I’d say this was all a mistake, just the product of extreme incompetence… except I don’t think it entirely is, anymore.

For instance, in Scotland and England, they’ve been pressuring residents to sign ‘do not resuscitate’ orders. A crappy thing to do all by itself but turned absolutely terrifying with what these nursing homes do after the forms are signed…they stop caring for the human being that signed the DNR. No medication, no food, no water, it’s sick. Granted it isn’t every nursing home, just the ones that have had new management thrust upon them, but it’s worrying that it’s any of them.

1. Socorro “Coco” Rivera

 When I first began this post – all those many eons ago – I found it very hard to decide who would take the final spot on my list. There were so many good candidates, each more deserving than the last. Ultimately, I settled on Coco Riviera not because she was the most badass – although as head of her family she certainly is that as well – but because more than any other character on this list, her dying prematurely would affect her story.

Think about it. If Grandpa Simpson died before the final episode, the worst that would happen is the Simpsons might stop making so many ageist jokes. Yoda dies, for seemingly no reason in his film and it doesn’t even slow down the conflict. Olenna, Hector, Faria and Mike all die as well and as for Violet well how long can they realistically keep her alive? Really the only ones that would leave any an emotional fallout are Ruby and Sophia.

But Coco? If she’s murdered before the end of her film, or even before it starts, it makes a difference to the rest of the story…people would literally fade from existence. She’s so integral to the film having any kind of a happy ending, that they named the whole goddamn thing after her.

However, there’s one scene in particular that I think sums up exactly why Coco reached this spot. Now before you watch the clip remember, Coco sufferers from an advanced form of dementia, unable to even remember her own daughter’s name.

The climax of the film lies in sitting round and actually listening to what a person with dementia has to say, rather than say bunning them away in a corner and sedating them when they get too distressed. Gee, thank god none of these people live in Scotland

Do you know what the sea witch running my country is doing to people like mama Coco? Yes, that’s right, murdering them. Specifically, over-medicating them – or at least the ones in nursing homes – when they inevitably become agitated from being separated from their families so long. Which has a terrible effect on an already frail body and is suspected of being the reason for the rise in dementia deaths during the current crises. The Scottish government’s idea of help to these vulnerable people seems to be, sedate until the body gives out and then repeat to decrease the surplus population. Sometimes when I think about it for too long, it makes me feel ashamed to be Scottish.

If this post has stirred your righteous anger, check out some of the articles that inspired it.


Elder abuse set to increase as UK enforces coronavirus lockdown measures, charity warns

Telegraph journalist says coronavirus ‘cull’ of elderly could benefit economy

Dying of neglect: the other Covid Care Home scandal

Nicola Sturgeon’s care homes catastrophe

Sedation ‘linked’ to dementia deaths surge in Scotland

Rights Risks to Older People in COVID-19 Response


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The Ultimate Lockdown Reading List

What Ho, Wee Readers – well it’s been a very long – what’s it been? Three Months of Lockdown here in the United Kingdom – and while some of us have used that time to better themselves with online courses or learning a new skill, I personally have set my sights on getting through my Goodreads Reading Challenge. All one hundred books. I’d been planning to write this post at the end of the year after I’d completed the whole challenge, but since we are more or less still locked in our homes, I thought it would be an interesting task to note down what I’ve been reading. Below you will find a list of all the books I’ve read and the reviews I’ve given them during Lockdown, or at least most of them. I didn’t include any I didn’t give a review to or whose reviews consisted of less than two words since…well, that wouldn’t be very interesting to read. There’s no worst to best, the numbers in the list simply note in what order they were read in – with 18 being the most recent, and 1 being the least. With that said, Wee Readers, onto the list.

18. The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

By Jonas Jonasson

Finished on: June 21st

A very entertaining, funny and fascinating story – I highly recommend this book to anyone who’s feeling a bit depressed during the Lockdown.

17. Jim Butcher’s The Dresden Files: Wild Card

By Jim Butcher

Finished on: June 17th

The story wasn’t great, the art wasn’t good at all (Marcone’s eyes weren’t even green) and there wasn’t nearly enough John Marcone in it. I know that last thing wouldn’t really be an issue for everyone – but it was an issue for me.

16. Bring Up the Bodies

By Hilary Mantel
Finished on: June 11th

This is even better than the first book, and I loved that. With, and I must say this, a far better title.

15. The Mirror & the Light

By Hilary Mantel

Finished on : June 12th

An excellent book, with a very sad ending.

14. The Handmaid’s Tale: The Graphic Novel

By Renee Nault

Finished on: June 6th

I loved this, a must read for anyone who liked the show or the original book. The art style was a little off putting – but giving the subject matter that was properly the point.

13. Wolf Hall

By Hilary Mantel

Finsihed on: June 9th

I’d enjoyed the BBC version when it came out a while back, and I was pleased to find that the book not only meets it in quality but surpasses it.

12. The Man With the Golden Gun

By Ian Fleming

Finished on: June 2nd

This is depressing

11. Thrawn: Alliances

By Timothy Zahn

Finished on: June 3rd

Is this book making me like the blue space Nazi? This feels slightly self defeating on the part of Star Wars – having said that, I can’t wait till Thrawn gets his first live action appearance, if its anything like this book it is going to be awesome.

10. The Neanderthals Rediscovered: How Modern Science is Rewriting

By Dimitra Papagianni

Finished on: May 30th

A fascinating look through the study and findings of research into the Neanderthals. And although they clearly don’t mean to, when they get to the bit describing Neanderthals in popular culture, they give a good list of novels to read next. I would recommend this book to anyone who is even the least bit interested in history or culture. Although I will say that it left me feeling rather sad, but then most things do in Lockdown, so I wouldn’t blame the book for that.

9. Mythos: The Greek Myths Retold

By Stephen Fry

Finished on: May 27th

A very well done stitching together of the sometimes contradictory myths of ancient Greece. I would certainly recommend this book to anyone who has even the most passing of interest in that fascinating realm of mythology.

8. Joss Whedon’s Names: The Deeper Meanings behind Buffy, Angel, Firefly, Dollhouse, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Cabin in the Woods, The Avengers, Doctor Horrible, In Your Eyes, Comics and More

By Vallerie Estelle Franked

Finished on: May 11th

A fantastic look into the names of the works of Joss Whedon. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in writing, mythology, history, or like myself – all of the above.

7. The Woman who Stole My Life

By Marian Keyes

Finished on: May 9th

This is a very well written book, which is why I’m giving it such a high mark – however, it was just too depressing for me, I couldn’t finish it.

6. Fool Moon

By Jim Butcher

Finished on: April 30th

An excellent addition to a series with a very flawed hero.

5. Bloodline

By Claudia Gray

Finished on: April 20th

This is an excellent book – I would recommend this not just to anyone who felt a little lost during the Force Awakens, or to avid Star Wars fans (like myself) eager to see the next Chapter of Princess Lea’s life; but to anyone who loves a good political thriller/ mystery.

4. This Charming Man

By Marian Keyes

Finsihed on: April 9th

Just a fantastic book – but I’ll be honest I really hope this isn’t representative of real Irish politicians behavior 😁

3. From a Certain Point of View

By Elizabeth Schaefer (Editor),

Finished on: April 1st

This book was fantastic, I would read it over and over again if I could…which seeing as I bought the audio-book, I guess I can. A must-read for anyone even a little interested in the star wars franchise, just brilliant 🙂

2. The Mystery Knight

By George RR Martin

Finished on: March 30th

** spoiler alert ** “I begin to understand why your father was so willing to be rid of you.” – I don’t care if he’s creepy as all seven hells, Blood-raven is the best 😁

1. The Iron Heel

By Jack London

Finished on: March 18th – not actually in the Lockdown, but a relevant enough book that I decided to count it anyway.

So…apparently Jack London was a witch who could see into the future. A well written and thoughtful book, who’s anti capitalist message is really needed in our times of terribleness. But I’ll be honest, it was so close to reality I found it a little depressing.

Well, that’s the last of them. So if you’ve enjoyed this reading list of the basically imprisoned autistic writer / editor in training why not follow the Wee Blog if you haven’t already. Also don’t forget to check me out on Twitter, Instagram, Pintrest, Tumblr, Facebook and of course, my Goodreads account. Where I am 59 books into my 100 book reading challenge. Also take a look at the Wee Mailing List for – eventual – brand new content. I am going to get it to it eventually, I promise. If you want check out the complete list of books in my Goodreads Reading challenge, click on the link and have a look. Until next time Wee Readers, get plenty of sunshine, and have a bonny day.

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Palpatine: A Villain through the Ages

Fresh off my Star Wars binge, I am very much still in a Star Wars mood – so what better time to talk about my favorite character that appears in all three trilogies: Sheev Palpatine. Now I’m not one to unhealthy obsess over the villain of the story – I mean I didn’t even like Loki – but I can’t lie, Palpatine has been one of my favorite characters for a long time now. Not in spite of his evil and conniving nature – but because of it. He tricks a whole Galaxy into doing his bidding all by the power of his own subtle political influence. And at the end of the Prequel trilogy this mastermind has won so thoroughly that the Heroes have to go into hiding for twenty years. When the light side does win a victory over good old (or would that be bad old) Palpatine, it’s in the form of the next generation, rather than the original heroes rising up and beating back the dark side. And even then, they don’t manage to kill him.

I could go on and on like this until the end of the post, but since that doesn’t exactly sound entertaining – here’s something completely different. As I’ve already mentioned Palpatine is one of the few characters that carries over into all three trilogies. However unlike say characters like C3PO or R2D2 – Palpatine does not have a consistency to his portrayal. Yet as we can observe, unlike Anakin Skywalker / Darth Vader – this lack of consistency to Palpatine’s characterization stems not from extensive character development but, rather a shift in the direction of each trilogy. What do I mean? Well, let’s take a look at all three of them – and I’ll lay it out.

Prequel Palpatine – is a subtle, politically savvy politician, who just so happens to also be a dark lord of the Sith. His plan to control a galaxy through fear and a phony war is brilliant and well thought out, and when at last our heroes catch on to what he’s doing, this dark lord of the sith is sufficiently powerful enough to either turn them or overpower them. If we were to look at this from a more Meta angle we might say that this, more controlled and subtle Palpatine, reflects the tightly plotted nature of the prequels. Who, even if you didn’t enjoy them, you have to admit were the most planned out – plot wise – of all three trilogies.

Original Palpatine (or rather ‘The Emperor’ since I don’t think I heard him referred to Palpatine once in the entire original trilogy) – is at the height of his power and influence. He builds giant space stations, that blow up planets and reigns with a steel grip around the Galaxy. He is also, I’d like to point out, at the height of his madness. All subtlety is gone out the spaceport, and replaced now with the slow creeping decay of a man that once had to think for his power, and now has no need for that at all. This version of Sheev Palpatine we might say, represents the Original trilogy’s more … and there’s no way to say this without it sounding like an insult … simplistic morality of war. This Palpatine doesn’t have to be subtle in his evil nature, because the Original Trilogy’s civil war didn’t spring from the manipulation of politicians, but rather their obvious corruption. Luke doesn’t have to feel bad about blowing up the deathstar, because it blew up Alderaan.

Just a brief WARNING, before we go on – this next park may contain major spoilers.

Sequel Palpatine – is an entirely different creature, from both previous incarnations. A rotting corpse hidden within the unknown regions of the Galaxy, relying on Darth Stupid – yes, that’s what I call Kylo Ren – to bring his granddaughter home, so he can take possession of her body. I think that’s his plan, it’s not clear. Whatever the case, the whole plan feels less impressive than controlling the Galaxy through a phony civil war and blowing up planets. It’s also quite notable that unlike his earlier incarnations, Palpatine only appears in the last movie of the Sequel Trilogy. Sure they claim he was controlling everything from within the shadows, but even knowing that supposed fact, we feel none of his presence in the other two films. Ultimately, this Palpatine’s plan feels more improvised than the other two, possibly reflecting the sharp directional twists and turns the Sequel Trilogy is known to demonstrate. Is the force all about the Jedi and the Sith, or does it belong to anyone? Is Rey in love with Finn or Kylo? Who knows, and who cares, it’s romantic love in the Star Wars Universe, it’s not like it would last anyway. I don’t mean to cut down a series of films that I enjoyed, but I can’t help but note that the inclusion of Palpatine in the final film – and only the final film – gives this incarnation a feeling of being shoved in at the end to please the nostalgia of hardcore Star Wars fans. Which…is something that possibly reflects the shift of power between fan and creator in our age of social media – for not since Jaja Binks has fan reaction so impacted the direction of a character.

So there we have it, three trilogies, three men with the face of Palpatine – and everyone has a favorite. For me, it will always be the prequels – what can I say I was raised on them, they’ll always have a special place in my heart. But what about you, what’s your favorite version of old Palps? Do you enjoy the genius of the Prequels? The Dark side’s living incarnate of the Originals? Or the nostalgic corpse of the Sequels? Comment down below if any of them particularly calls out to you. If you’ve enjoyed this little exploration of my totally not creepy obsession on the most evil character in Star Wars History, make sure to follow the Wee Blog if you haven’t already. Also check me out and follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, Facebook and Goodreads. And sign up for the Wee Mailing List, for all new content. Stay vigilant, get plenty of Sun and, until next time my Wee Readers, may the force be with you.

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The Great Star Wars Lockdown Binge

What ho Wee Readers, and welcome to The Great Star Wars Lockdown Binge. I know, I know, sometimes it feels like this Lockdown is going on forever. And I won’t lie, two months is a ridiculously long time to be stuck in your house – I mean if it wasn’t for streaming services like Disney Plus or Amazon Prime, I’d have snapped along time ago. Turning to more positive subjects…surprise, I’ve got a Disney Plus account now, and of course the only thing to do when one forks over the nearly sixty quid for a subscription, is to force her family to join her in the Great Star Wars Binge. Knowing of course that because they are locked in the house with her, they can’t say no forever.

‘The Great Star Wars Binge’, as I have so coined it, consists of all eleven canonical films – that is, the prequels, the originals, the sequels and both anthology films – along with the two canon series I can in anyway justified making my family watch: The Mandalorian and The Clone Wars. I did plan to watch Rebels as well, but it just never happened. We also did not watch Resistance, because I don’t care how long they keep us locked in here like we’e prisoners. Nothing will make me watch that willingly.

The scoring for each film shall go as follows:

0 – Could Not Be made to Watch

1 – Crap

2 – Just Barely Above Crap

3 – Technically not a bad film, but did not grab me at all

4 – A Good film, but nothing more than that

5 – Absolutely excellent – would watch again

Anything higher than 5 – best film on earth, I am going to binge watch this for the rest of my life. This is what I will be watching on my deathbed.

Right, on with the show.

Star Wars: Episode 1 – The Phantom Menace

The first installment of the groundbreaking prequel trilogy – telling the story of the fall and corruption of the Jedi knight Anakin Skywalker into the sinister Sith Lord Darth Vader. This is a highly under-rated film full of political intrigue, and questions of the true culpability of the republic and the Jedi in the continuation of the practice of Slavery within the Galaxy. Yes, the republic has less influence in the outer rim planets – but you’d still think the Jedi would make some attempt to free one of their new members mothers from a life of slavery.

Mum’s Rating: 6 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 3 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 5 / 5

Final Rating: 14

Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones

Jump forward a couple of years and now our young Vader is played by Hayden Christensen. Half love story, half spy thriller – revealing the first sinister steps of Senator Palpatine’s plan to control the galaxy through fear. Creating a fake war, with both sides basically under his control, a plan so dastardly and ingenious that not even the Jedi can see what they are walking into. Palpatine is awesome…I mean evil, completely evil, not cool, or one of my favorite characters…completely evil.

Mum’s Rating: 4 /5

Dad’s Rating: 3 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 4/5

Final Rating: 11

Star Wars: Episode III – The Revenge of the Sith

The culminating episode of the tragedy of Anakin Skywalker, this is my favorite Star Wars film. Everything set up in the last two films comes to beautiful fruition in this tragic film in which a man tormented with dreams of his wife dying in labor – the same kind of dreams that preceded his own mother’s death – seeks the dark arts for a way, anyway, to prevent her death. In the end he ends up betraying his colleges, his friends, his family – all in the name of the power to save the woman he loves. Who dies anyway, from a broken heart. God I love this movie!

Mum’s Rating: 3.5 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 3 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 7 / 5

Final Rating: 13.5

The Clone Wars – The Seige of Mandalore

Set between Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith – the Clone Wars tells a fascinating story of the war that ultimately destroyed not only the Republic but the Jedi as well. However for this Star Wars Lockdown Binge, we only watched the four last episodes – covering the siege of Mandalore and Order 66 – because it’s ‘unreasonable’ to expect people to wait the length of a seven season cartoon, before the next star wars film.

Mum’s Rating: 4 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 0 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 4 / 5

Final Rating: 8

Solo: A Star Wars Story

Or as I like to call it, Star Wars : Episode 3.5 – Solo Eleven. Yes, ultimately at it’s heart Solo is is a heist film, coincidentally set in the Star Wars Universe. And I’m not saying that as a bad thing either, the Star Wars franchise needs to grow and expand if it’s to stay relevant, and trying out new forms of story and film is how you do that. The fact that it tells the backstory of one of science fiction’s most iconic characters, is really just the cherry on top of an excellent adrenaline filled heist flick. The reason it lost a point for me was that it was so adrenaline filled that watching it made me feel like I was having a panic attack – which does somewhat take away my enjoyment of the film.

Mum’s Rating: 3 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 5 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 4 / 5

Final Rating: 12

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

While Solo is the Heist film of the Star Wars franchise, Rogue One is the war movie. I know, I know – technically all the Star Wars films are war movies, but you know what I mean. While the numbered films are grand and epic, with bright flashing laser swords and high crashing drama – this film is hard and gritty. While the other nine are flying up in their ex-wings trying to be the hero who blows up the deathstar – the people of this film are down on the ground sacrificing their lives so that those ex-wings even have the chance to play the hero.

Mum’s Rating: 5 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 4 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 5 / 5

Final Rating: 14

Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope

I’ll just say this now, to get it out of the way, I truly believe that the blowing up the Death Star scene is the worst part of not just this Star Wars film, but the entire franchise. It goes on much too long, and the only interesting development happens right at the end – Han’s arrival and Luke’s success. That being said, this isn’t a bad film, in fact I very much enjoyed the rest of it – just not enough to give it a 5.

Mum’s Rating: 4 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 3 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 3 / 5

Final Rating: 10

Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back

This is a good film, undoubtedly but I would hesitate to say that this is where Star Wars peaked. Although to be fair, Star Wars is such a large franchise – both in the legend and canon sense – that to say it peaks at any one place, no matter it’s individual merit – is the height of absurdity. Although, having said that, they never have quite topped the shock of the plot twist of Luke’s true Father, though goodness knows they’ve certainly tried.

Mum’s Rating: 4 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 5 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 4 / 5

Final Rating: 13

Star Wars: Episode VI – The Return of the Jedi

This is my favorite of the three original films, and I’m not too proud to admit that the Ewoks play a large part of that. In fact I’m even going to be so bold as to say that they are the best part of the film overall. Or at least the parts that they occupy – the ground battle on the moon of Endor – are much better than some of the parts in which they did not – that is, Luke’s confrontation with the Emperor. I don’t mean to throw shade at something that so many people – including myself – enjoy, but when you’ve just come from Prequel Palpatine’s careful manipulations of not only his future student, but the entire Galaxy, Original Palpatine’s expectation for Luke to turn and join him because he hurt his friends, is almost ludicrous in its stupidity. That’s not how motivation works, Emperor, you used to know that.

Mum’s Rating: 4 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 3 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 5 / 5

Final Rating: 12

The Mandalorian

Baby Yoda. Baby Yoda. Baby YODA. BABY YODA! Oh yeah and there’s something about a Mandalorian but be honest…that’s not why we’re tuning in.

Mum’s Rating: 5 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 3 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 5 / 5

Final Rating: 13

Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens

Look down at those scores, now look back at me, now down at the scores again. I swear I did not go into The Force Awakens intending to give it such a high score. I still hold fast to the view that its plot is just a tad too similar to A New Hope’s to be coincidental. However having now watched both films very close together in a short amount of time, I have now amended this theory somewhat. While both films follow the same story beats, to an almost religious level – young hero/heroine from a backwards sand covered planet finds a droid with important information that she/he has to deliver to the Rebellion/Resistance so they can stop the Empire /First Order – the Force Awakens plot seems to stand as a superior version. Things that still don’t exactly make a great deal of sense to me in a New Hope – like why were the plans for the death star being sent to Obi Wan Kenobi specifically – seemed to go far more smoothly in this new version of the story. In the Force Awakens, Rey finds the droid by accident and then bumps into Finn determined to finish Poe Dameron’s last mission, again by chance. The resistance itself doesn’t give the call to adventure for these two heroes, unlike Luke and Kenobi. I mean I know you could say that Lea was under attack and she had to think fast – but Rouge One reveals that it was always the plan to give Kenobi the plans, so I’m not sure what the endgame was for that idea.

Mum’s Rating: 5 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 8 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 5 / 5

Final Rating: 18

Star Wars: Episode VIII – The Last Jedi

I will stand on my pedestal and say that this is absolutely the worst of the three sequel films. Of course, saying that is less of a condemnation than you’d think. I genially think that taken out of context, all three films are well made, good films that anyone would enjoy. However in the context of the Star Wars franchise, I don’t think it adds much – I did like the emphasis on the force being something that belongs to everyone rather than just the Jedi, but that was completely disregarded in the next film so it didn’t really matter .

Mum’s Rating: 4.5 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 3 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 4 / 5

Final Rating: 11.5

Star Wars: Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker

I liked this film. It was a good fun film, its story was exciting and it didn’t rely on just copying the plot from the originals like the first two sequel films did. Also – and I know many people may disagree with me on this – but I liked where the characters ended up in their respective arcs. That being said, I’d be lying if I claimed the addition of Palpatine in this film didn’t feel a bit tacked on to the overall sequel trilogy’s story.

Mum’s Rating: 5 / 5

Dad’s Rating: 3 / 5

Wee Lassie’s Rating: 4 / 5

Final Rating: 12

In the Race for which is the superior Star Wars property – that I was able to make the others watch – we have:

In the rear The Clone Wars, limping along with an 8, from two people that enjoyed it but didn’t love it.

Barely two points ahead we can spot Episode IV: A New Hope, lagging with a 10.

Just a step beyond that you can see Attack of the Clones with a proudly won 11, and the only interesting love story in all of new canon. With the Last Jedi, only a hair’s breath in front with an 11.5.

Next up we have the shocking trio of Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker and Solo: A Star wars Story, each sporting a shinny new 12 to their name.

Baby Yoda and his Mandalorian guardian are making good time; alongside Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back with their ratings of 13. Revenge of the Sith, not too far in front with it’s hard fought for 13.5.

In joint second place, Rouge One: A Star Wars Story and Episode I: The Phantom Menace prove that the sacrifices have all been worth it with their solid ratings of 14.

And finally leading the way, in a shocking twist of fate to most Star Wars fans – Episode VII: The Force Awakens is winning this race, with an astounding rating of 18.

Do you agree with my parents and I’s ratings, would you have chosen differently? If so, drop me line down in the comments – Star Wars opinions are as varied as its fans and each deserves a voice. If you’ve enjoyed this look into the deep sense of obsessive fandom and boredom that provoked this binge during Lockdown, remember to follow the Wee Blog if you haven’t already. Also check me out on Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, Facebook and Goodreads. And sign up for The Wee Mailing List to receive all new content. Until next time Wee Readers, have a bonny day and may the force be with you.

Just a brief note before we leave, if you’ve enjoyed this and other posts like it on the Wee Writing Lassie, why not buy me a Wee Cup of Coffee, or drop me a tip over on Ko-fi. Which is linked to the image below.

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